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Do You Have Job Search Burnout?

Job Search Burnout, New Year New Job, Using Job Boards Effectively

Today the blog features a guest post by @LisaRangel of Chameleon Resumes.

Despite it being a new year, many job seekers have been looking for a job already…in some cases, conducting that job search for a while and are burned out.

While some job seekers have new inspiration to start a search, I know some of you may be tired and burned out on your search and need a renewed source of perspective. Well, you have come to the right place.

When you are burnt out on your job search, you may need a mental break. Rest to rejuvenate is crucial, but what I think can be equally as effective is to give a good, hard look at the job search activities that you have been doing. Are you setting yourself up for disappointment and job search burnout? Ask yourself these questions: 

(1) Have you submitted to more than 10 – 20 online job postings per week? 

If yes, then you may be spending too much time on job boards and not enough time engaging actual people. You should not be spending more than 10% of your job search time on job boards. Set up Google Alerts and job alerts within notable job boards to have applicable jobs emailed to you and stop wasting time mining for jobs on the boards. Learn 5 Ways To Use Job Boards More Effectively that you should be doing now.

(2) Of the job applications you applied to online, for how many did you find someone at the company and reach out directly to connect about your application?

If the answer is less than 50%, you are depending on the computer/database gods to get you an interview, when you need to be talking to people. You need human discussion (phone and email) and contact (in person meetings) throughout this process to stay energized and get hired. “A computer hired me,” said no one ever.

(3) How many people, actual people, are you talking to (via email, phone and in person) regarding your job search in a positive, specific way?

I suggest keeping a log of how many conversations you are having with people. If it is less than 10-15 people per week, you need to step it up. Again, people hire people–so talk to people. Computers do not hire people, so do not spend time submitting to electronic job applications for most of your time. To optimize your job search networking, read: Job Search Networking Return to Neverland

(4) Do you ask your friends/family/professional contacts to “keep an eye out for job opportunities for you”? Do you say the job-killing-phrase, “I’m open to anything?”

If this is exactly how you ask them, I ask you: Do they know what you do, really? Do they know specifically what you want? It is much better to say, “I am looking for an accounting manager position with a mid-sized company in manufacturing” or “I am seeking a customer service position with a technology firm” than say “Hey, let me know if you hear of any job openings” — Specific is so much better than general each and every time! Specific also breeds confidence.  For more on this, check out this article: “3 Ways to Help People Help You”

(5) Are you speaking to the right people in your industry to get to the right job leads?

How many new contacts are you adding to your contacts list each week–or are you circling back to the same 50 – 200 people each month? Add new people by attending industry and profession-related networking events, alumni get-togethers, former co-worker get-togethers and events in your community. Be sure your business card markets you in a memorable way and check out, Great Networking Business Card Examples.

Generally speaking, if you are not speaking to people about your job search, not speaking in specifics to people about your job search and/or not speaking to the right people, you could be spinning your wheels a bit, which will contribute to your burn out. It is important to rest and have fun to recharge…but it is also important to do the right activities suggested above to help support your success and preserve your mindset. Good luck!!

Written by: Lisa Rangel
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Categories: Finding New Job

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